Rust Roadmap for 2017

Pull request #1728 lead to the outlining and defining of the 2017 Rust roadmap.

As someone who's been watching Rust closely over the past few years (and has occasionally used it for a side project or two) based on the roadmap I find a lot of promise and hope for Rust in 2017.

At a high level, by the end of 2017:
  • Rust should have a lower learning curve
  • Rust should have a pleasant edit-compile-debug cycle
  • Rust should provide a solid, but basic IDE experience
  • Rust should provide easy access to high quality crates
  • Rust should be well-equipped for writing robust, high-scale servers
  • Rust should have 1.0-level crates for essential tasks
  • Rust should integrate easily into large build systems
  • Rust's community should provide mentoring at all levels

Really valued the "non-goals" being explicitly defined and stated:

To that end, it's worth making some explicit non-goals, to set expectations and short-circuit discussions:
  • No major new language features, except in service of one of the goals. Cases that have a very strong impact on the "areas of support" may be considered case-by-case.
  • No major expansions to std, except in service of one of the goals. Cases that have a very strong impact on the "areas of support" may be considered case-by-case.
  • No Rust 2.0. In particular, no changes to the language or std that could be perceived as "major breaking changes". We need to be doing everything we can to foster maturity in Rust, both in reality and in perception, and ongoing stability is an important part of that story.

RFC 1774 continues to elaborate and provide details on specific steps that would be taken to achieve the high level goals listed above.

Read this and feel confident in the Rust team's sensible decisions to grow the platform. The future looks solid.